Crock Pot Mole Chicken Chili

Crock Pot Mole Chicken Chili

Adapted from Slow Cooker Revolution

BAH Note:  My note in the margin says to “reduce adobo and make a double batch”.

  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons chili  powder
  • 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 can chicken broth
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup peanut butter
  • 3 tablespoons Minute tapioca
  • 2 teaspoons minced chili in adobo sauce
  • 2 pounds chicken thighs, skinned

Combine the onions, vegetable oil, chili powder, cocoa powder, cinnamon and cloves in a microwave safe bowl and heat on high for 5 to 10 minutes, until the onion softens.  Transfer the onion spice mixture to the crock pot.

While the onion and spices microwave, season the chicken with salt and pepper.

After transferring the onions to the crock pot, stir in the chicken broth, tomatoes with their juices, peanut butter, tapioca, and chipotle.  Add the chicken, cover and cook 4 to 6 hours on low until the chicken is done.

Transfer the chicken to a cutting board to cool slightly then shred it into bite sized pieces.

Allow the juices in the crock pot to settle and skim any fat from the surface before adding the chicken back to the pot.

Rosemary Beef Tenderloin

Rosemary Beef Tenderloin

Adapted from Saveur

  • 2 pounds beef tenderloin, trimmed and tied
  • 1/2 cup canola oil, divided
  • 3 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Combine the rosemary, garlic, a pinch of kosher salt, and half the oil in a small bowl.  Rub the mixture all over the tenderloin, transfer the tenderloin to a platter or piece of foil, and let sit at room temperature for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Heat your oven to 425 degrees.  Melt the butter and remaining oil over medium heat in an ovenproof frying pan.  Add the tenderloin to the pan and brown on all sides.

Transfer the frying pan to the oven and roast until an instant read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the tenderloin registers 125 to 130 degrees for medium rare or 140 degrees for medium.

Remove the tenderloin from the oven, loosely tent the frying pan with foil, and let the meat rest for 20 minutes before serving.

Flashback Friday – Lost in Translation

The following post originally appeared on BAH on 26 August 2009.

Soup's On

Some families have recipes that they pass down like heirlooms. These treasures connect generations and keep traditions alive. Other families mostly just have the memories of dishes that used to be, like Grandma’s fried chicken or Auntie’s pound cake. That would be my family.

I had all of my grandparents alive growing up. I even had great grandparents. To keep the great grandparents straight, we called them by the name of the street that they used to live on way before I was born…at least that’s the story I was given. So we had Michigan Grandma and Grandpa and Kilbourne Grandma. The great grandparents were already senior citizens by the time I can first remember them. Michigan Grandpa, for example, was born in the late 1800′s. So by the late 1970′s, he had already seen the world change around him. Seriously, he came to America on a boat after the turn of the century. He didn’t speak a word of English and, as the story goes, had a note pinned to his coat with instructions to get him on a train and out to his father who had already moved to this country. Upon arriving at the train station, my great great grandfather was called to let him know his son had arrived. My great grandfather had never seen a telephone before and thought the box through which his father’s voice was coming was the devil. Or so I was told.

I was also told how good the cold cucumber soup was that Michigan Grandma used to make. My aunts and uncles would get together and eventually someone would bring up Michigan Grandma’s cucumber soup, or potato pancakes, or Michigan Grandpa’s homemade booze. As we like to say today, good times. I never got to try the soup or potato pancakes. But we did run across a bottle of Michigan Grandpa’s booze in the cellar after he died. That was one recipe that definitely would not make for a good heirloom.

Now, as an adult, I wanted to try and recreate the cold cucumber soup. My parents were coming up for a visit and I thought it would be great to surprise my dad with it. He had said that my uncle had the recipe. So I asked for it. I was expecting something that resembled an actual recipe. What I got instead was a cryptic shopping list. No quantities. No instructions. It looked like this:

  • cucumbers, grated or chopped
  • salt
  • dill
  • onion, chopped fine
  • sour cream
  • stir ice in really well
  • hard boiled eggs
  • vinegar, if desired

Well now, what was I supposed to do with that? Since I’d never had the original soup, I had no idea what I was working towards. So, I decided to come up with my own interpretation of this family classic. After my dad finished his second bowl of soup, he said it was just as good as Grandma’s. While I may have lost something in the translation, I think this definitely gets filed away under family treasures.

Cold Cucumber Soup

  • 2 cucumbers, peeled and rough chopped
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • Fresh dill to taste
  • 1/2 shallot diced
  • 1 cup sour cream, plus more to taste
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar

Place cucumbers, shallot, salt, and dill in a food processor. Pulse until cucumbers are nearly pureed. Add sour cream and pulse until creamy and smooth. Add vinegar and additional sour cream to taste and pulse to mix.

{Printable Recipe}

Pork and Sweet Potato Stew

Just because I made this stew in the Advantium doesn’t mean you can’t tinker with the recipe and make it in your oven.  Your cooking time will be longer in the oven.

Pork and Sweet Potato Stew

Adapted from The GE Advantium Cookbook

BAH Note: I finally figured out how to cut sweet potato into perfect cubes.  Cut a thin slice off of one long side of the sweet potato.  Rotate the sweet potato so that the flat side is down on your cutting board.  Now cut a thin slice off of the left and right side of the sweet potato.  Rotate the sweet potato one more so that the last uncut side is accessible and cut a thin slice off it.  You’ve basically just squared your sweet potato.  Cut the pointy (or rounded) ends and remove any remaining peel.  Cut the sweet potato lengthwise into 1/4 inch thick “boards”.  Lay each “board” on your cutting surface and cut them lengthwise into 1/4 inch sticks.  Cut the sticks into cubes.  Viola!

  • 2 pounds pork tenderloin, cut into 1 inch medallions
  • 1 large onion, diced (or 1 cup butter braised onions)
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • l large sweet potato, cut into 1/2 inch cubes (approximately 2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups apple cider (can substitute chicken broth)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 medium apples, peeled, cored, and diced
  • 1/4 cup sliced green onion

Lightly coat a 4 quart casserole dish with cooking spray and add the pork, onion, and diced red pepper.  Microwave on power level 7 for 10 minutes.  Carefully remove the dish from the Advantium and stir the contents.

Add the sweet potato, apple cider, salt, paprika, cumin, allspice and red pepper flakes to the casserole dish.  Cover and place in the Advantium on the metal baking tray (use potholders to remove the glass tray).

Press the SpeedCook button then scroll to My Recipes, New Recipe.  Set the cook time for 20 minutes and then use the following settings: U=4, L=4, M=5.  After 20 minutes, carefully remove the casserole dish, add the apples and stir.  Cover and continue to cook another 10 to 15 minutes at the same settings until the pork is done.

Melissa’s Sour Cream Biscuits

Sour Cream Biscuits

Adapted from Melissa d’Arabian

  • 4 tablespoons butter, cubed and frozen for 15 – 20 minutes
  • 1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons buttermilk, heavy cream, or half and half (may not be needed)

Heat your oven to 425 degrees and line a half sheet pan with parchment.

Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, oregano, and salt in the food processor and pulse a few times.  Add the frozen butter and pulse until the mixture looks like crumbly like wet sand.  Add the sour cream and pulse until the dough comes together.  If your dough is still dry and crumbly, sprinkle the dough with the buttermilk (heavy cream or half and half) a teaspoon at a time and process just until the dough comes together.

Turn the dough out onto your prepared sheet pan and pat it into a thick circle, about 4 inches across.  Using a bench scraper, cut the dough into 6 wedges and spread them out on your sheet pan.  Bake for 12 to 15 minutes.

Flashback Friday – Habit

The following post originally appeared on BAH on 24 August 2009.

Steaming

Just because I am a creature of habit, doesn’t mean I won’t try a new way of doing things. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. And sometimes it works but I like my way better.

This recipe falls into that last category.

Restaurant Style Asparagus

Washington Post

Asparagus can be parcooked 1 to 2 hours in advance; refrigerate, then saute just before serving.

  • big pinch kosher salt
  • 1 pund asparagus, woodey ends discarded
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • lemon zest

Fill a large skillet with 1 or 2 inches of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Have a clean, dry towel ready.

Add the asparagus, adding water if necessary to  make sure the vegetables are covered. Cook until just tender, 4 to 5 minutes for thin spears or 6 to 10 minutes for thicker spears. Use tongs to transfer the asparagus to the towel. and pat dry.

Use just enough oil to coat the bottom of the skillet and heat over medium-high. When hot, add the asparagus and salt and saute for 3 to 4 minutes, until they start to brown a little. Garnish with lemon zest and serve hot.

{Printable Recipe}