Kerrygold Brussel Sprouts

Today’s Kerrygold Premium Spreadable Reduced Fat Butter tip crosses a line.  The line between love who love brussel sprouts and those who don’t.  And maybe, just maybe, this tip will inspire some to embrace the beauty of pan roasted brussel sprouts.

Think back to the Kerrygold Grilled Cheese.  The only thing missing from that to make a balanced meal was some vegetables.  Sure, you could microwave a bag of frozen vegetables but why would you settle for a one dimensional side when you could have the pan roasted goodness of brussel sprouts?  Forget about the bland, mushy things that have been boiled to death.  Pan roasting them in a bit of Reduced Fat Butter brings out a subtle, sharp, almost mustardy edge and they stay firm enough to spear on your fork.  This is the only way we make brussel sprouts at our house.  And there’s never a single one left at the end of the meal.

Did I mention that The Mistah and I used to be on opposite sides of the brussel sprouts line?  We used to be…and then I pan roasted them for him.  So on that night when you need an easy vegetable to round out your meal, give pan roasted brussel sprouts a try.  You might just be surprised.

Pan Roasted Brussel Sprouts

BAH Note:  Don’t be alarmed if some of the leaves end up loose in your pan.  Let these leaves get good and charred.  They will add a bit of crunchy texture to the dish.

  • 1 container fresh brussel sprouts
  • 2 tablespoons Kerrygold Premium Spreadable Reduced Fat Butter
  • kosher salt
  • Kerrygold Ivernia cheese, grated (optional)

Trim the stem ends from the brussel sprouts, cut them in half, and remove the outer layer of leaves if they look a little sad.

Melt the butter in a large frying pan over medium high heat.  Add the brussel sprouts, cut side down, and sprinkle with a pinch of salt.  When the cut sides are nicely charred, carefully shake the pan or use tongs to flip them over.  Continue to cook, occasionally giving the pan a shake, until the brussel sprouts are bright green and are just tender when you bite into one.

Serve the brussel sprouts with a sprinkle of grated Ivernia cheese.

Official Disclosure: Kerrygold provided me with their Premium Spreadable Butter and Premium Spreadable Reduced Fat Butter to use in developing these tips as part of a contest.  The opinions, and #butterlove, expressed here are my own.

Flashback Friday – Crush

Flashback Friday

The following originally appeared on 2/11/09 at Exit 51.

Crush

Who was the first person you had a crush on?  It’s ok, I won’t tell anyone.  Me?  My first crush was probably Shawn Cassidy.  Yes, I grew up surrounded by Tiger Beat and Teen Beat magazine hotties.  Oddly enough, I was not allowed to buy those magazines. In hindsight, I think that may have shielded me from some less worthy crushes like Scott Baio, Kirk Cameron, and Duran Duran.

I still get crushes.  But let’s be honest, what are the odds of your crush ever turning into a real relationship?  Unless of course, you happen to be Katie Holmes and your crush is Tom Cruise.

tb10a

I find that more and more, I develop crushes on recipes.  They woo me with their online photos and descriptions until I can think of nothing else.  I am beholden to their charms.  And then, finally, I give them a chance.  Much like the fickle adolescent that I used to be, I tend to get over these crushes pretty quick.   The idea of them is better than the reality of them.  But some do turn into lasting relationships.  They are the TomKat of my cooking world.

Here’s my latest crush.  I can’t decide whether it’s a keeper or not.  I think I need to give it one more chance to win me over.

Crushed Sweet Potatoes with Roasted Garlic and Ginger
The Washington Post, From executive chef Ethan McKee of Rock Creek at Mazza.

The dish can be fully assembled, then cooled, covered and refrigerated up to 2 days in advance. To reheat, cover loosely with aluminum foil and bake in a 350-degree oven for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally.

  • 4 large (3 pounds) sweet potatoes, scrubbed well, then cut lengthwise into quarters
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 4 sprigs rosemary
  • 10 to 12 cloves garlic (from 1 head)
  • 1 cup nonfat vegetable broth
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger root
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar substitute or light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon good-quality olive oil

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Have ready a large, lidded baking dish.

Combine the potatoes, herb sprigs and garlic in the baking dish. Pour the vegetable broth over and season lightly with salt and pepper to taste. Cover (or use aluminum foil, wrapped tightly) and bake for 1 hour or until the potatoes are easily pierced with a fork and the garlic is tender.

Transfer to the stovetop; discard the herb sprigs and use a potato masher to crush the vegetables. Add the grated ginger and the brown sugar substitute or brown sugar, stirring to mix well. Drizzle the oil over the top, mixing just to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings as needed. Serve warm.

Peppers and Zucchini

This was one of those rare dishes that got a split decision in our house.  The Mistah, he says he is not much for zucchini.  Although he “claims” to like my curried zucchini soup.  And he devoured the zucchini and pepper quesedilla that I made last night.  So I don’t know what to think.

Actually, I know what I think.  I think this makes a lovely, light dish. It’s a refreshing change from the usual suspects that show up on our plates in the role of vegetables. And it’s versatile.  Serve it as a side dish; use it as a condiment to top a burger; transform it into an entree with some couscous or quinoa.

So pay no mind to The Mistah and his zucchini fickleness.  Peppers and zucchini will give you a taste of summer any time of the year.

Peppers and Zucchini

Adapted from Bon Appetit – Fast, Easy, Fresh

BAH Note:  I started out to make a poblano rajas with zucchini.  Bon Appetit – Fast, Easy, Fresh describes rajas as roasted chile strips cooked with onion and spices.  But they wanted me to add a half cup of cream to the vegetables.  And I just couldn’t bring myself to do that.  I also neglected to add any seasoning other than kosher salt.  Maybe when I go to heat up the leftovers, I will add a pinch of ancho chili powder.

While I think this recipe is pretty SB friendly, if I wanted to make it completely South Beachy, I would use olive oil, or a combination of butter and olive oil to sautee the vegetables.

  • 2 poblano chiles
  • 2 red peppers
  • 2 small zucchini, sliced
  • 1/2 cup onions, diced
  • 1 tablespoon butter

Place a rack directly under your broiler and line it with a sheet of foil.  Place the poblano chiles and red peppers on the foil.  Broil until the exterior is completely charred, carefully turning them as needed.  Transfer them to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes.  Carefully remove the charred skin (and seeds if you like) and roughly chop the peppers.

Heat the butter in a dutch oven over medium heat.  Add the chopped peppers, zucchini, and onions.  Saute until the onions are translucent and the zucchini is tender.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.

{printable recipe}

Bittman’s Glazed Carrots

As I type this, which has no connection to when it will flash across the interweb as a published post, I am a few short days away from embarking on a week’s vacation away from computers, blog, interwebs, and tweets.  My brain seems to already be in vacation mode, leaving me searching for something interesting to say about glazed carrots.

Frankly, I’ve got nothing.  Not even a picture to tempt you with their glazed deliciousness. All I can say is that in less time than it will take us to pack up our car for the trip, you can be serving up some glazed carrots.

Now that I think about it, these would make a great side to pack for our road picnic.  Great; now in addition to packing, cleaning the house, and finding a swim suit that I will not be embarrassed to wear in public, I need to make a batch of glazed carrots to save me from the temptation of rest stop french fries.

Why didn’t t anyone ever tell me how much work it is to go on vacation?

Bittman’s Glazed Carrots

Adapted from Mark Bittman

BAH Note:  This recipe is quite versatile and adaptable to whatever flavor combinations you prefer.  Prefer savory over sweet?  Substitute balsamic or soy for the orange juice.  Or get edgy and use ginger beer for a sweet and spiced flavor.  You “could” use whole carrots that you have peeled and cut into rounds or sticks.  I choose to use baby carrots straight from the bag.  Mr. Bittman says to use a saucepan 6 inches or less across.  I used a 2 quart saucepan just fine and suspect that I would have even been ok using my 10 inch frying pan.

  • 1 pound carrots, peeled and cut into rounds or 1 pound baby carrots
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup orange juice

Combine all the ingredients in a small saucepan.  Bring to a boil, cover and reduce heat to a simmer.  Cook for 20 minutes, or until carrots are tender.  Remove the lid and cook the remaining liquid down until it is nearly evaporated.  Serve the carrots with a bit of glaze.

{printable recipe}

Molly’s Butter Glazed Radishes

What the heck does a picture of the cherry blossoms have to do with butter glazed radishes?  Your choices are:

  1. a)  Pink
  2. b)  Things that I “discovered” this year
  3. c)  A distraction for not having a picture of butter glazed radishes

Ok, this one is actually a trick question because it’s all of the above.

It’s funny that I just talked about food prejudices and how I have been guilty of letting my dislike of one form of a food keep me from enjoying it in any form.  I must add radishes to that list.

My previous knowledge of radishes was limited to them as hard rounds in my iceberg lettuce salad.  Not even fresh and peppery, they were blah and bland; so I banished them.  I read curiously about radishes and butter, wondering how people could find that enjoyable.  I could not comprehend the attraction to radishes anymore than I could understand why sane, rational people would brave the crowds of tourists to see the cherry blossoms in Washington, DC.

And then I did.

I realized that people come from all over the world to see the cherry blossoms in bloom.  Here I am with them a short metro ride away and I had never been bothered to see them.  I missed the peak blooming period but was still awed by their gentle grandeur.   I don’t think much can rival the beauty of cherry blossoms falling in the breeze like snowflakes.  And since I got there early enough to avoid the crush of tourists, I enjoyed that beauty in quiet solitude.

I think my visit to the cherry blossoms was right around the same time I decided to give butter glazed radishes a try.  Something about the way Molly described them made me curious…”…sweet, almost, and very delicate.  It’s quiet.”  I admit, I had been wrong about the cherry blossoms.  Maybe I was wrong about the radishes too?

Not only did those butter glazed radishes taste absolutely delightful –  tender and delicate, warm and buttery – the cooking transformed them from hard red to a soft, gentle pink.  Clearly I hadn’t given radishes enough credit to be more than just something crunchy in salad.

So on both accounts, I stand corrected.

Molly’s Butter Glazed Radishes

Adapted from Molly Stevens (All About Braising) as seen on Orangette

  • 1 pound radishes
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/8 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

If your radishes are not already trimmed, trim the roots and greens.  Soak the radishes for 10 minutes in a bowl of water to loosen any dirt then drain the water and scrub the radishes.

Place the radishes in a single layer in a 10 inch skillet.  Add the butter, water, salt, and sugar and bring to a simmer.  Cover the skillet and continue to simmer for 20 to 30 minutes or until a paring knife can easily pierce the radishes.

Remove the lid and carefully shake the skillet to roll the radishes all around the sauce.  Continue simmering another 5 to 10 minutes or until the liquid cooks down to a glaze that coats the radishes, increasing the heat if necessary.

{printable recipe}

Flashback Friday – +2

Flashback Friday

The following originally appeared on 10/13/08 at Exit 51.

+2

Despite my recent foray into decluttering my recipe files at home, I can’t help myself when it comes to printing new recipes to try.  Until someone comes up with a rehab program for this affliction, I’m just going to have to do my best to stay on top of it.  This may be easier said than done but I’m going to give it a shot.  And I’m going to start by trying these two new recipes that I stumbled across online.

The first is the infamous No Knead Bread, which Mr. Bittman has recently reworked to take less time and to be whole grain friendly.  Seeing as how I have almost five pounds of whole wheat flour taking up space at home, this is a no brainer addition to my to do list.

The second is a variation on roasted squash from the Washington Post’s Recipe Finder.  Since I don’t want SFC to get bored seeing plain roasted veg on his plate, this looks like a good place to start.

And I’m thinking that these two would go great together with something as simple as some hearty mushroom soup, salad, a quick frittata, roasted chicken, or Mr. Bittman’s Roasted Salmon with Pinot Noir Sauce.  Looks like I’ve got most of the makings of an entire meal right here.

Fast No Knead Whole Wheat Bread

Mark Bittman – New York Times

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup whole rye flour
  • 1/2 cup coarse cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • Oil as needed.

Combine flours, cornmeal, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add 1 1/2 cups water and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest about 4 hours at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

Oil a standard loaf pan (8 or 9 inches by 4 inches; nonstick works well). Lightly oil your hands and shape dough into a rough rectangle. Put it in pan, pressing it out to the edges. Brush top with a little more oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 1 hour more.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake bread about 45 minutes, or until loaf reaches an internal temperature of 210 degrees. Remove bread from pan and cool on a rack.

Yield: 1 loaf.

Herb Crusted Butternut Squash Wedges

Stephanie Witt Sedgwick – The Washington Post

  • 3 small butternut squash, about 8 ounces each (a total of 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons herbes de Provence (see headnote)
  • 1/3 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.

Slice off the stem and root ends of each squash. Working with one at a time, stand the squash on its root end. Cut the squash in half vertically from top to bottom, then cut each half into 2 or 3 wedges, discarding the seeds in each wedge. Repeat with the remaining squash. (The squash can be peeled, if desired.)

Place the wedges on the prepared baking sheet and toss with the oil until well coated, then arrange so that the wedges’ points are facing upward. Sprinkle with the herbes de Provence (crushing them between your fingers as you work) and salt, then season with pepper to taste. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and roast for 30 minutes, then carefully remove the foil and let the wedges roast for 20 to 30 minutes (depending on their size), until they are fork-tender and starting to brown. Let sit for 5 minutes on the baking sheet before serving. (As the squash is eaten, it is scraped off its baked skin.)

Garlicky Green Beans

I may have mentioned before that we’ve gotten kind of bad about making sure our meals include some kind of vegetable.  Occasionally, I manage to include a veg on the plate.  More often than not, I don’t.  Here’s one of the ones that actually made it into a meal.

Garlicky Green Beans

Adapted from Kim O’Donnel

BAH Note:  KO’D recommends testing your oil by dipping the end of a green bean in it.  When the oil is ready it will sizzle.

  • 1 pound green beans, ends trimmed, snapped in half
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chili-garlic sauce
  • 1 teaspoon white wine
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 1/4 cup scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil, optional

Combine soy sauce, sugar, chili-garlic sauce, and wine in a small bowl and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a nonstick frying pan set over high heat until hot but not smoking.  Add green beans and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes.  Add the water, stir, and cover the pan.  Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the beans are crisp-tender, approximately 5 minutes.  Transfer the beans to a plate and drain off any remaining water.

Add the remaining 2 tablespoons vegetable oil to the pan and place over medium high heat.  Add the ginger and scallion and cook approximately 30 seconds, stirring constantly.

Return the green beans to the pan, give the soy sauce mixture a stir and add it to the pan.  Cook, stirring constantly until the liquid is almost evaporated, approximately 1 minute.  Drizzle with sesame oil, if using, and serve immediately.

{printable recipe}