Flashback Friday – +2

Flashback Friday

The following originally appeared on 10/13/08 at Exit 51.

+2

Despite my recent foray into decluttering my recipe files at home, I can’t help myself when it comes to printing new recipes to try.  Until someone comes up with a rehab program for this affliction, I’m just going to have to do my best to stay on top of it.  This may be easier said than done but I’m going to give it a shot.  And I’m going to start by trying these two new recipes that I stumbled across online.

The first is the infamous No Knead Bread, which Mr. Bittman has recently reworked to take less time and to be whole grain friendly.  Seeing as how I have almost five pounds of whole wheat flour taking up space at home, this is a no brainer addition to my to do list.

The second is a variation on roasted squash from the Washington Post’s Recipe Finder.  Since I don’t want SFC to get bored seeing plain roasted veg on his plate, this looks like a good place to start.

And I’m thinking that these two would go great together with something as simple as some hearty mushroom soup, salad, a quick frittata, roasted chicken, or Mr. Bittman’s Roasted Salmon with Pinot Noir Sauce.  Looks like I’ve got most of the makings of an entire meal right here.

Fast No Knead Whole Wheat Bread

Mark Bittman – New York Times

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup whole rye flour
  • 1/2 cup coarse cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • Oil as needed.

Combine flours, cornmeal, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add 1 1/2 cups water and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest about 4 hours at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

Oil a standard loaf pan (8 or 9 inches by 4 inches; nonstick works well). Lightly oil your hands and shape dough into a rough rectangle. Put it in pan, pressing it out to the edges. Brush top with a little more oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 1 hour more.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake bread about 45 minutes, or until loaf reaches an internal temperature of 210 degrees. Remove bread from pan and cool on a rack.

Yield: 1 loaf.

Herb Crusted Butternut Squash Wedges

Stephanie Witt Sedgwick – The Washington Post

  • 3 small butternut squash, about 8 ounces each (a total of 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons herbes de Provence (see headnote)
  • 1/3 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.

Slice off the stem and root ends of each squash. Working with one at a time, stand the squash on its root end. Cut the squash in half vertically from top to bottom, then cut each half into 2 or 3 wedges, discarding the seeds in each wedge. Repeat with the remaining squash. (The squash can be peeled, if desired.)

Place the wedges on the prepared baking sheet and toss with the oil until well coated, then arrange so that the wedges’ points are facing upward. Sprinkle with the herbes de Provence (crushing them between your fingers as you work) and salt, then season with pepper to taste. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and roast for 30 minutes, then carefully remove the foil and let the wedges roast for 20 to 30 minutes (depending on their size), until they are fork-tender and starting to brown. Let sit for 5 minutes on the baking sheet before serving. (As the squash is eaten, it is scraped off its baked skin.)

Trendy

Cookies

One of my nicknames in high school was Trendy Wendi…thanks Tiffany Wilson, sorry I didn’t see you at the reunion last summer.  The funny thing about that is that I am, and have always been, so far behind the times that it’s not funny.  I’ve never been a gauge of what the “cool kids” are doing.  I was still inching along with dial up when most of the world was running at lightning fast dsl speeds.  Seven years ago I tried to convince The Mistah that Tivo was nothing more than a glorified VCR, a passing fad, when he said he wanted one.  And sometime in the 90’s when an ex was gushing over something called an MP3 player, I couldn’t understand the hype.  It is safe to assume that I have come to see the light on all these things.  I’m just not what you would call an “early adopter” of technology.  I’m same way with food too. Continue reading “Trendy”

You Don’t Speak For Me Chris Kimball

I debated whether I should start this post by asking who died and made Chris Kimball boss….looks like I just did.  Mr. Kimball has taken it upon himself to suggest that the world of food bloggers is somehow a slap in the face to trained professionals who, in his words, possess “thoughtful expertise…that comes from real experience, the hard-won blood-on-the-floor kind.”  I’m referring to his recent Op-Ed in the New York Times in response to the announcement that Gourmet magazine will cease to exist.

I understand perfectly that this is Mr. Kimball’s opinion and he’s entitled to it.  He’s also entitled to share that opinion with all who will listen.  But please Mr. Kimball, don’t self righteously express your voice when it suits to get your opinion printed in the New York Times and then discount others doing the same when it doesn’t suit your business model.  The idea of each person having a voice, people in this world die for that privilege.

Mr. Kimball, do you really think that  “the world needs fewer opinions”?  Personally, I think its imperative that different opinions can be expressed and considered.  Not all opinions will be good ones, but why is it that you think only the opinions of “experts” are worthy?  Is that really the world you live in?  I don’t.

And what about your idea that only those who graduate from the “school of hard knocks” are credible?  Are you saying that my life experience has no credibility?  Really, could you be THAT arrogant?

Furthermore, how can you defend this opinion that so blatantly insults your publications’ readers?  Do you realize that some of us on this “ship of fools” are the same people who make it possible for your magazines to exist?  We’re the ones who subscribe to Cook’s Illustrated or Cook’s Country.  We’re the ones who buy your annual cookbooks.  We’re the ones paying YOUR salary Mr. Kimball.

Let me know if I’m following your logic correctly…if I aspire to become a credible cook, the only way to do that is by enrolling in an accredited program?  If that’s the case, then why have I sent your company a check for the last three years?  Silly me, I thought that by using tested recipes, my skills would grow.

And about those recipes, you do know that you ask us, the “instant pundits”, to test them during development for your publications.  You do know that, right?  Why would you do that if you think that our experiences are not worthy?  Or did you just mean anyone who doesn’t belong to your CI, CC,  or ATK club?

And please, I really would like to understand your logic behind making print subscribers also pay additional for online content.  Is it really necessary for you to double dip into my finances just so I can access your Premium Content online?  You may call that “a thriving paid Web site”.  I call it greed.

I would never presume to say that my skills in the kitchen are anywhere near those of someone who has been to cooking school.  But since when do you have to wear a chef’s hat in order to be a good cook?

When all is said and done Mr. Kimball, I do respect your right to your opinion.  But I respect myself more than to be a pawn in your world.  So I’m going to express my opinion in the one and only way that matters to you, with my pocketbook.  Gourmet may be gone but your magazines aren’t the only other players left in this game.

Will it make me a hypocrite to leave the Cook’s Illustrated recipes up that I’ve posted here?  Maybe so.  But I’d rather be a hypocrite than a fool.  And if I were to continue to subscribe to your publications, that’s exactly what I’d be.

Thanks for the memories Chris.  You really know how to ruin a good thing.

For other responses to the OpEd piece, mosey on over to The Amateur Gourmet for Adam’s post, or to Sky Full of Bacon , Wise Ax, The Gurgling Cod, or The Breakaway Cook. And for Mr. Kimball’s blog response to all this, click here.